Timber ceilings

It’s been fun having my Dad come over to help with timber ceilings in the main kitchen/ dining/ living space. Unlike plasterboard ceilings in the rest of the house, we’ve decided to have something a bit more special here. Hit & miss European redwood battens of varying widths give the ceiling a nice warm feel, as well as help with the acoustics in this large open plan space.

After a bit of a hiccup with the original timber order, we cut the battens to the correct lengths, sanded them down & applied a clear surface treatment. As we didn’t have a luxury of scaffolding inside, we invested in a finishing nail gun, which allowed me to fix the battens with one hand, while holding/ locating them with the other. This really worked a treat.

It was an intense week, but we are very happy with the results. Looking forward to starting clay plastering next week!

 

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Timber ceilings

Roofing Pt2

This week’s weather has been kind enough to allow us install woodfibre boards on top of roof I-beams, and wrap the boards with windtightness membrane, held down by timber counterbattens. Larger timber battens will provide support for the corrugated metal roof. It’s good to have two layers of protection above the straw panels.

We have been tweaking the design of junctions between timber cladding and roof with Mike, and decided that it’s best to finish off installation of external woodfibre boards to walls and insect mesh to close off vented cavities before the corrugated roof goes on.

On Saturday Joyce & me finished off sealing the last charred cedar cladding boards, which was very satisfying to see. It’s now all stacked and ready to use.

There was a bit of excitement when a herd of escapee cows passed our site – I wonder if they wanted to have a peek at this straw filled passivhaus? 😉

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Roofing Pt2

staining

After the mammoth task of concrete slab grinding, a small time window before the straw/ timber frame arrives has allowed me to get on with some prep work: cutting and staining roof rafters and battens that will be fully exposed under the roof. The idea is that these timber members will visually complement charred timber cladding on walls, so I’ve used thinned black OSMO natural oil woodstain applied to sawn Welsh Douglas Fir. This created a very nice effect of maintaining a good wood texture whilst providing a near black stain. Very happy with the results.

staining