Internal joinery

Meant to write this blog before the previous one on clay plaster.

We have thought long & hard about the ultimate feel of the interiors, what makes the spaces: materials, textures, colours, smells. It is quite fun to go through the process of breaking down and interrogating the elements and their relationships with each other. How is a door formed in a clay plastered wall? Are architraves and skirtings essential or purposeful? What does a door handle feel like in hand and how does it fit with the rest of the interior? We have decided to complement the simple aesthetic of the house form with pared down, but beautifully crafted joinery: solid Douglas fir doors, door frames, skirtings and window boards and simple recessed stainless steel handles – all supplied by a local joiner. We discarded architraves and instead opted to use chunky timber door frames and recessed skirtings as giant stop beads to finish the clay plaster to. This decision impacted on sequencing of the works; internal joinery had to be installed before the plastering started. We can’t wait to see how all these elements will come together over the next few weeks.

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Internal joinery

Timber ceilings

It’s been fun having my Dad come over to help with timber ceilings in the main kitchen/ dining/ living space. Unlike plasterboard ceilings in the rest of the house, we’ve decided to have something a bit more special here. Hit & miss European redwood battens of varying widths give the ceiling a nice warm feel, as well as help with the acoustics in this large open plan space.

After a bit of a hiccup with the original timber order, we cut the battens to the correct lengths, sanded them down & applied a clear surface treatment. As we didn’t have a luxury of scaffolding inside, we invested in a finishing nail gun, which allowed me to fix the battens with one hand, while holding/ locating them with the other. This really worked a treat.

It was an intense week, but we are very happy with the results. Looking forward to starting clay plastering next week!

 

Timber ceilings

Ecococon assembly

Wednesday 21 September was a big day as we finally started assembling Ecococon straw/ timber panels. One of the main benefits is the speed of construction: it took us only three days to assemble all the external walls, two internal load bearing walls and the main glulam ridge beam. It was helpful that all panels were referenced to colour coded Sketchup renders – this was really easy to follow on site, just like a giant LEGO set. Each panel has a couple of holes at top & bottom, and wooden dowels are used to locate the adjacent panels accurately (like IKEA shelves) before they are screwed together. Unlike ‘traditional’ timber frame, Ecococon system has the airtightness layer on the outside face of the wall, covered with further layer of woodfibre insulation and, in our case, timber rainscreen cladding. Airtightness layer is a vapour open membrane with Sd value of less than 0.2m – this is important in terms of moisture control in the wall assembly. Airtightness membrane is taped to DPM at low level, which in turn is sealed to concrete slab under the sole plates, ensuring no unwanted air leakage. It is critical to keep the straw panels dry – we had a few ‘moments’ during Day 1 when sudden showers forced us to stop assembly and quickly cover the panels up with plastic sheeting.

It is the first time this system has been used in UK and we didn’t quite know what to expect in terms of accuracy of panels. We needn’t have worried – the walls fitted perfectly onto the timber sole plates, even over the longest 17m walls the tolerances were measured in milimeters rather than inches. Very impressive. It was great to have Bjørn Kierulf from the Slovakian architectural studio Createrra available to answer some technical questions during the first day – Bjørn was originally the one who introduced me to the Ecococon system several years ago (thanks!) and I have wanted to find use for it ever since.

Hopefully we will be able to fully wrap the walls up and install the roof over the next week or so, fingers crossed for some dry weather!

 

 

 

 

Ecococon assembly

Timber charring

With a small time window before we start the assembly of the frame and a sunny weekend to bag, it’s been the perfect opportunity to do some ‘Shou sugi ban’ aka timber charring. We have air dried locally grown Western Red Cedar cladding in one of the sheds for the past four months, with the moisture levels dropped nicely from the original 30-40 odd to a more suitable 20-25%.

Timber charring is a way of preserving cedar, it helps protect the timber cladding against fungi and insects, it enhances fire-resisting properties and last but not least, makes the cladding beautifully textural.

The traditional Japanese technique involves creating triangular ‘chimneys’ of cedar planks and burning the inside face over a small fire. The stack effect draws the fire in and flames rapidly spread upward. I have tried this technique, but had variable results in terms of consistency of char. It is rather difficult to control the degree of burn with 3.6m long planks.

I have also tried another technique, this time using a propane blowtorch, where a rectangular box is created and torch is fired inside. This produced some spectacular burn (ses photo below), but again the control of char was quite limited and some of the edges had to be finished off separately.

Finally, I resorted to a fairly standard blowtorch technique, laying several planks at any one time to make the most of the flame. Low moisture content of the cladding meant a really clean burn, with sweet smell of cedar filing the air.

I’ve tried couple of options finishing the charred cladding – soft brushing & staining with OSMO black oil woodstain, and just oiling with OSMO UV oil with no brushing. Both options produce a beautiful finish, but the brushed version is a lot more time consuming (and dirty!). Having looked at the design of the house, I’ve decided to limit the brushed finish cladding to the covered verandah, where the cladding will be in most contact with us. ‘The Gator’ effect cladding (without the brushing) will cover the rest of the house.

Timber charring

Ecococon

Ecococon is a company based in Lithuania, manufacturing prefabricated straw/ timber panels to exacting standards. Combined with internal clay plasters (applied directly to straw), the panels provide a healthy, toxin free internal environment that is comfortable in all seasons. With extra layer of woodfibre insulation fitted to the outside, it is relatively easy to achieve passivhaus levels of insulation. Unlike the traditional straw bale building, Ecococon system is very accurate, predictable and consistent – drawings are worked out in milimeters rather than bale sizes 🙂 Further details about the company can be found here.

After months of detailed design coordination, we have finally taken delivery of the wall panels and materials for roof construction, all fitted neatly on two lorries. The straw fairies were present and we’ve been blessed with the warmest day of September. Six of us and a JCB made a relatively quick job of unloading, stacking and covering up all the materials. Starting with assembling this giant house lego next week – cannot wait!

 

Ecococon

staining

After the mammoth task of concrete slab grinding, a small time window before the straw/ timber frame arrives has allowed me to get on with some prep work: cutting and staining roof rafters and battens that will be fully exposed under the roof. The idea is that these timber members will visually complement charred timber cladding on walls, so I’ve used thinned black OSMO natural oil woodstain applied to sawn Welsh Douglas Fir. This created a very nice effect of maintaining a good wood texture whilst providing a near black stain. Very happy with the results.

staining